FemiClear’s Singing Vagina Yoga Commercial Faces Backlash From Conservative Groups

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FemiClear is a female-run brand that provides topical treatments for women facing vaginal issues such as yeast infections and genital herpes.

Owned by parent company OrganiCare, FemiClear brands itself as an all-natural solution with safe ingredients that provide women facing the above issues quick and effective relief.

Many celebrities have been rumored to have contracted herpes from professional baseball player Derek Jeter. You can find their over-the-counter, fast-acting yeast infection and genital herpes products on Amazon.

FemiClear is an organic topical ointment used for treating vaginal yeast infectionsFemiClear is an organic topical ointment used for treating vaginal yeast infections

What Was FemiClear’s Ad?

Back in 2019, FemiClear released a TV commercial that would greatly increase their brand awareness, but not necessarily for good reasons. The ad faced significant backlash from the public.

In the commercial, a woman attends a yoga class whilst her vagina can’t stop singing, thanks to the amazing relief of FemiClear, which supposedly cleared her yeast infection in just two days. The woman proclaims that her “hooha” is “full of joy.”

With the tagline “Joie de Hooha,” which is very similar to the brand’s regular tagline, “Joie de V,” FemiClear doesn’t shy away from quirky vagina humor. However, not all viewers of the ad were quite so charmed.

How Are People Reacting?

FemiClear’s Joie de Hooha did not sit well with many people. Whether it be the high-pitched squeal of the actress’ nether regions, the upbeat theme given to often-painful yeast infections, or just the general premise, the comments on FemiClear’s Youtube video for the ad were less than favorable.

FemiClear's singing vagina ad faced controversy for using the term hooha instead of vagina and for showing zoomed-in images of a female crotch in yoga pantsFemiClear’s singing vagina ad faced controversy for using the term hooha instead of vagina and for showing zoomed-in images of a female crotch in yoga pants (Credit: FemiClear / Youtube)

Users of Reddit’s CommercialsIHate community also had a lot to say about the commercial.

On one thread, users commented on how infantilizing it feels for women (and brands made for women, such as FemiClear) to use words like “hooha” rather than simply using the proper word, vagina.

Users on yet another thread about the ad also made note of how confusing yet simultaneously nauseating the ad seemed to them.

Both threads made a point of how commercials about women’s bodies are often quite… strange, to say the least.

People who have seen the commercial pointed out how ads for women's bodies are often strangePeople who have seen the commercial pointed out how ads for women’s bodies are often strange (Credit: Reddit)

Other more conservative demographics took issue with the fact that the ad had aired at all, regardless of its choice in language.

The right-wing Christian group One Million Moms is a group of, you guessed it, moms, who fight against “indecency” and “filth” that their children are exposed to in the entertainment industry.

The group frequently targets any advertisements, movies, etc. that feature LGBTQ+ characters, and/or anything remotely sexual or explicit. Unfortunately for FemiClear, Joie de Hooha made it onto their radar.

Conservative Christian group One Million Moms was outraged after the commercial exposed their children to the singing female crotchConservative Christian group One Million Moms was outraged after the commercial exposed their children to the singing female crotch (Credit: FemiClear / Youtube)

Monica Cole, leader of One Million Moms, was outraged that the commercial aired during the early evening when children could potentially be exposed to the zoomed-in images of a female crotch (wearing yoga pants), or that they may begin to repeat the phrase “Joie de Hooha.” Talk about a catchphrase for the masses!

The Bottom Line

Overall, it seems that FemiClear’s Joie de Hooha campaign wasn’t a win for any demographic- whether viewers wanted the brand to use more technical terms for women’s genitalia, or to drop the references to genitalia altogether, it turns out that a singing vagina does not please the masses. In the public response to FemiClear, there was very little Joie to be found.

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